From the series Saturday Girl by Casey Orr

"Saturday Girl is a series of portraits of young women in Leeds; specifically as seen through their hairstyles.

It is an exploration of what hair means culturally and personally to young women and how they experience and use the power inherent in becoming visible as women.

All of the photographs are taken on Saturday afternoons in a pop up studio in the Leeds, and on Saturdays this city brims with young women, out with girlfriends, shopping and generally hanging around looking and being looked at. 

These girls are experimenting with fantastically creative ways of expressing themselves. We have always dyed and cut, sprayed and shaved; as a way of stating individuality and belonging to a tribe. All this big hair also reflects past trends in hair fashion, passed down to them intuitively through culture.

Saturday Girl is an exhibition and series of events including  film screenings, talks and performances which explore ideas of beauty, power and visibility in relation to women, Leeds Gallery, March 2014.” -Artist Statement

(Source: itsnicethat.com, via donutguts)

jedavu:

Photographer Translates His Nightmares Into Surreal, Haunting Photographs

by 19-year-old photographer Nicolas Bruno

(via brouhahamagazine)

There are books in which the footnotes or comments scrawled by some reader’s hand in the margin are more interesting than the text. The world is one of these books.

(Source: cigareto, via xlikegold)

theparisreview:

“Paper stock and binding glue aside … few can deny that there is something deeply evocative about the sense-memory of a large expanse of assorted, uncurated books—much trash, and often much less treasure—at a library sale or used bookstore. As Farjeon writes, these ‘must all come to dust in some little bookroom or other—and sometimes, by luck, come again for a moment to light.’”
Sadie Stein on Eleanor Farjeon’s The Little Bookroom, winner of the first Hans Christian Andersen Award.

theparisreview:

“Paper stock and binding glue aside … few can deny that there is something deeply evocative about the sense-memory of a large expanse of assorted, uncurated books—much trash, and often much less treasure—at a library sale or used bookstore. As Farjeon writes, these ‘must all come to dust in some little bookroom or other—and sometimes, by luck, come again for a moment to light.’”

Sadie Stein on Eleanor Farjeon’s The Little Bookroom, winner of the first Hans Christian Andersen Award.

Eating Pizza and Dumb Similes

You
Unsettle
Me

The way tidal waves
Unsettle
The sea

tristamateer:

When I was young, I used to suck on lemon wedges;
I used to drink the juice from pickle jars.
I grew up with a sour taste in my mouth, but

I grew up.

Every time you call me “sweet”,
I am reminded of how little you know about me.
I imagine the first time we kiss,
you will pucker your lips and try to

spit me back out.

(via brouhahamagazine)

twogranniesandanaxe:

Clio, the muse of history.
She was the daughter, like her nine sisters, of Zeus and Mnemosyne. She had a son, Hyacinth (yeah, like the flower). Her depictions usually show her with laurel leaves on her hair, a history book, parchments, a trumpet (it’s said she invented this instrument), along with the time (a clock) and space (the Earth), but I only chose the book to draw her. It was… easier ;)

twogranniesandanaxe:

Clio, the muse of history.

She was the daughter, like her nine sisters, of Zeus and Mnemosyne. She had a son, Hyacinth (yeah, like the flower). Her depictions usually show her with laurel leaves on her hair, a history book, parchments, a trumpet (it’s said she invented this instrument), along with the time (a clock) and space (the Earth), but I only chose the book to draw her. It was… easier ;)

(via robindianaashe)

Wouldn’t we be quite the pair?—you with your bad heart, me with my bad head. Together, though, we might have something worthwhile.

a letter from Zelda Fitzgerald to her husband F. Scott Fitzgerald. (via tre-cherous)

(via fuckyeahfitzgerald)